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UC expert highlights what you need to know about net neutrality

The way you use the internet could soon change, if the Federal Communications Commissions votes to overturn net neutrality rules.

Posted: Dec. 4, 2017 7:12 PM
Updated: Dec. 4, 2017 7:27 PM

UTICA, NY-- The way you use the internet could soon change, if the Federal Communications Commissions votes to overturn net neutrality rules.

Net neutrality is the principal that Internet service providers (ISPs) should give consumers access to all legal content and applications on an equal basis, without favoring some sources of blocking others. In 2015 under the Obama Administration, regulations were passed to protect the principals of net neutrality.

But chairman of the FCC, Ajit Pai, has unveiled plans that will likely result in change that policy.

"One of the arguments is the government shouldn't get involved in the Internet," said Anthony Martino, director of Northeast Cyber Security and Forensic Center at Utica College. "The Internet has always been a relatively free and open place and there's a lot of people that argument that the federal government has no business getting involved in it. The second is... if you're running a business providing Internet service and one entity is costing you more than others shouldn't each entity who does that I have to pay."

Content providers Apple and Google support net neutrality, taking the stance that consumers are already paying for connectivity and deserve to have a quality experience. But dozens of broadband companies such as AT&T Comcast and Verizon argue that the rules harm the free market and innovation.

"Really at the heart of the argument is Internet service providers are they are utility," Martino said. "Are they providing something that should be provided equally to all within their geographic range, or are they simply a private corporation providing a service and if you as customer don't like the service you can go get it somewhere else."

The FCC is expected to vote on Dec. 14.

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