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Windmill hearing discusses money, downfalls

STARK, N.Y. (WKTV) - A public hearing was held in the Town of Stark Tuesday, regarding a proposed project to put 40 windmills in Stark, and in the neighboring Town of Warren. Tuesday was another public hearing before the Town of Stark board makes a decision on the several hundred thousand dollar project.

The windmills have been a hot button issue for some time, especially since a first proposal to put 68 windmills was vetoed by the state Public Service Commission.

The current project proposal is to put 21 windmills in the Town of Warren, and 19 in the Town of Stark. However, as expected, not everyone living in those towns, or even neighboring towns are on board with the idea.

Currently an application is in front of the Stark town board, to join the Town of Warren in the Jordanville wind project. Stark, like the Warren and Herkimer County stand to make a lot of money if these windmills are built.

The money generated by the Town of Stark, from the windmills would be $200,000 up front, and another $88,000 per year from a PILOT program.

"This is our once in al lifetime opportunity to help the local taxpayers who have lived here their whole lives. Were just trying to help them out the best we can, and we think this is a good start." said Richard Bronner, Supervisor of the Town of Stark.

Some who attended Tuesday's meeting say that money shouldn't be the only thing the town board considers.

"What difference does it make if your property taxes are low and you can't reside in your house." said Sue Brander, a member of the Advocates for Stark.

Brander says she would not have a windmill on her property, but right next to it. She is worried about health risks, and developers digging into the ground and ruining her water supply.

Supervisor Bronner says the Town of Warren is the lead agency in this project, and once they go ahead and give the approval then Stark will make a decision. He says if that decision is also an approval, then a permit could be approved by early next year, and construction could start sometime late next year.





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