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Richfield Springs and Canastota to receive stimulus funds for clean water projects

ALBANY, N.Y. (WKTV) - Governor David A. Paterson announced Thursday numerous clean water projects selected to receive American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding.

22 communities from across the State will be awarded $130 million for the construction of water treatment plants and the installation of sewer system upgrades, including Madison and Otsego Counties.

“When President Obama signed the stimulus legislation, I committed our State to using these recovery funds wisely and efficiently, to get New Yorkers working on projects that will have lasting benefits to our communities,” said Governor Paterson. “These projects will not only create jobs, they will help keep New York’s waters clean without the need to raise local property taxes. I thank President Obama and the New York Congressional Delegation for enabling New York to repair antiquated water infrastructure and preserve public health while swiftly responding to the current economic downturn.”

Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Pete Grannis said: “For more than 40 years, New York has made tremendous progress in improving water quality, but many facilities throughout the State have now outlived their useful life expectancy. If we are going to continue our success and protect the gains we have made, our water infrastructure needs support for projects that restore and rebuild – projects like those that will be funded by the economic recovery monies Governor Paterson announced today. These investments in new jobs and improved water quality will provide lasting economic and environmental benefits to communities across the State.”

The projects will create an estimated 1,300 direct and indirect jobs across the State in many communities that have been deeply affected by the current recession. These positions will include construction, mining, and professional opportunities, such as carpenters, plumbers, electricians, heavy-equipment operators, engineers, steel miners, manufacturers as well as legal jobs, high-tech jobs, and plant operators. Communities throughout New York have used low-cost Clean Water State Revolving Fund financing for a variety of wastewater infrastructure projects and, as a result, millions of New Yorkers have cleaner, safer water resources. Adequate and sustainable wastewater infrastructure is critical to a community’s environmental quality, public health and economic vitality.

Environmental Facilities Corporation (EFC) Acting President Matthew Millea said: “Since April, Governor Paterson has announced over $300 million in stimulus funding for clean water projects spanning the State. These projects will have a positive impact on the lives of New Yorkers, local businesses, and municipalities that have been hard-hit by the recession. Thanks to Governor Paterson and the hard work of New York’s Congressional Delegation who fought for this funding, our State will benefit from the increased economic activity and improved water quality that will result from these urgent water quality projects.”

The EFC Board of Directors voted Thursday on the majority of these projects, and the remainder will be voted on at the June 30 Board meeting.

The ARRA requires that 20 percent of clean water funds be reserved for Green Innovation projects, such as energy efficiency, solar and water conservation elements of projects. New York’s Green Reserve is $86 million and will be distributed via a new $35 million Green Innovations Grant Program. The remaining $51 million will fund innovative initiatives at traditional sewage projects that qualify for ARRA monies.

To learn more, visit the EFC Economic Recovery webpage.

The second round of water infrastructure projects to be funded includes:

Town of Cuba, Allegany County will receive $5.3 million to support the Town of Cuba in constructing a wastewater collection system which will serve residents around the perimeter of Cuba Lake. Construction of this collection system will eliminate residential discharges currently impacting the water quality of Cuba Lake. The collected sewage will be conveyed to the Village of Cuba’s newly improved treatment plant.
Village of Cuba, Allegany County will receive $2.1 millionto support the planning, design, and replacement of much of the Village’s collection system and construction of improvements to their treatment plant. The new collection system will correct excessive inflow issues, while the improvements at the plant will allow the Village to more consistently and efficiently achieve discharge requirements, thus improving water quality.

Town of Greenport, Columbia County will receive $9.4 million to support the design and refurbishment of the Town’s treatment plant, which was built in 1977 and is reaching the end of its useful life. The refurbished plant will provide better and more consistent treatment of wastewater, improving water quality into a tributary of the Hudson River.
City of Hudson, Columbia County will receive $8.8 million to support the planning, design, and improvement of the City’s wastewater treatment plant and pump station that will greatly reduce the potential for discharge of high wet weather flows into the Hudson River, and the replacement of treatment equipment to be more effective and energy efficient.

Town of Catskill, Greene County will receive $231,000 to support the design and construction of improvements to the collection and treatment system for the Hamlet of Cementon to correct problems with excessive flows from water inflow and infiltration into the system. These improvements, including wastewater disinfection, will help to improve the water quality of this discharge to a tributary of the Hudson River.
Town of Greenville, Greene County will receive $728,000tosupport the design and construction of improvements to the Town’s treatment plant, which was built by a private corporation and transferred to the Town in 1994. This work will repair or replace key treatment components which will allow the Town to more consistently and efficiently achieve discharge requirements, thereby improving water quality.

Town of Essex, Essex County will receive $7.7 million to support the design and construction of wastewater collection and treatment system in the Hamlet of Essex, a designated historic district. Failing septic systems in this Hamlet have impacted the water quality of Lake Champlain. This new collection and treatment system is expected to correct longstanding water quality concerns.
Town of Newcomb, Essex County will receive $1.8 million to support the design and construction of the refurbishment of the Town’s treatment plant, which was built in 1963 and is reaching the end of its useful life. The refurbished plant will provide better and more consistent treatment of wastewater, improving water quality into a tributary of the Hudson River.

Town of Schroon, Essex County will receive $4.4 million to support the design and construction of the refurbishment of the Town’s treatment plant, which was built in 1973 and is reaching the end of its useful life. The refurbished plant will provide better and more consistent treatment of wastewater, improving water quality into a tributary of the Hudson River.

Town of Ticonderoga, Essex County will receive $4.1 million to support the design and construction of various treatment plants and sewer upgrades for the collection and treatment of both sanitary wastewater and wet weather flows in the vicinity of the La Chute River, the discharge from Lake George into Lake Champlain. This work is part of a multi-year effort by the Town to improve these facilities and the quality of the discharge to Lake Champlain.

Town of Rutland, Jefferson County will receive $2.2 million to support the planning, design, and construction of collector sewers to connect the Hamlet of Felts Mills to the City of Watertown treatment plant addressing decades-old public health and water quality issues.

Village of Sackets Harbor, Jefferson County will receive $8 million to support the planning, design, and replacement of the Village’s treatment plant and portions of the collection system. The Village’s new plant, replacing one originally built in 1927, will provide better and more consistent treatment of wastewater, as well as correcting excessive inflow issues.

Village of Canastota, Madison County will receive $13.5 milliontosupport the planning, design, and rehabilitation of the Village’s treatment plant and construction of a storage tank to better manage high flows during wet weather. The improvements to the plant will allow the Village to more consistently and efficiently achieve discharge requirements, thus improving water quality.

Nassau County and the Town of Oyster Bay, Nassau County will receive $13 million to support a joint project that will correct a longstanding issue of failed septic systems whose discharges have been identified as the primary cause of beach closures in the Mill Creek area. ARRA funding will support the planning, design, and construction of the collection system, pump station, and force main for the Locust Valley section of Oyster Bay in Nassau County.

Niagara Falls Public Water Authority, Niagara County will receive $11 million to support the removal of sediment and debris from and repair of the North Gorge Interceptor. This rock tunnel, built in 1937, conveys 53 million gallons of wastewater daily during dry weather. This cleaning and repair work will restore this tunnel back to its expected capacity.

Village of Richfield Springs, Otsego County will receive $5.4 million to support the planning, design, and refurbishment of the Village’s wastewater treatment plant. The refurbished plant, originally built in 1972, will allow the Village to more consistently and efficiently achieve discharge requirements, thereby improving water quality.

Town of Brookhaven, Suffolk County will receive $10.4 million to support the planning, design, and construction of a new treatment plant to provide improved water quality to discharges to the groundwater of Long Island. The new energy efficient tertiary treatment plant will allow the Town to more consistently and efficiently achieve water quality requirements.

Town of Brasher, St. Lawrence County will receive $1.4 million tosupport the design and construction of a collection and treatment system for the Hamlet of Helena. Wells have become contaminated from failing septic systems within this Hamlet. Collection and treatment of wastewater is expected to eliminate this public health risk, as well as improve the water quality of the nearby St. Regis River.

Village of Granville, Washington Countywill receive $1.3 million to support the design and construction of improvements to the Village’s treatment plant, which was built in 1970 and no longer is able to consistently achieve discharge standards. This work will replace key treatment components which will allow the Village to more consistently and efficiently achieve discharge requirements, thereby improving water quality.

Town of North Salem, Westchester County and Town of Southeast, Putnam County will receive $13 million to fund a joint project that will correct a longstanding issue of failing septic systems along the shores of Peach Lake, which is part of the New York City water supply. ARRA funding will support the design and construction of the collection system, pump station, and treatment plant that is expected to improve the water quality of Peach Lake, as well as provide greater assurance of the purity of the drinking water for New York City.



The following quotes were provided in support of the clean water infrastructure projects to receive ARRA funds:

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer said: “Over the past decades, the task of maintaining our water infrastructure has fallen by the wayside, exposing us to wastewater spills and substandard water quality. These funds will provide an economic shot in the arm by financing improvements and expansions to our water infrastructure, and will improve public health, enhance water quality, while creating jobs.”

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said: “This is a great investment for New York. These federal funds will create new jobs, rebuild critical infrastructure, help us clean up the environment and deliver clean drinking water to New York families. I will continue working with Governor Paterson, Senator Schumer and the entire Congressional Delegation to make sure New York gets its fair share from the federal government.”



Congressman Tim Bishop said: “These funds will create short-term construction jobs and long-term economic growth in Brookhaven’s Empire Zone. Without this recovery funding our local infrastructure, including clean water and wastewater treatment projects, would not be able to keep up with the increased demand on Long Island. At the same time, I will continue fighting to make sure our community receives our fair share of funding for sewage and wastewater infrastructure so we can make the investments to improve our economy.”

Congressman John Hall said: “Clean water is one of our most precious and fundamental resources. Investing in clean water infrastructure helps protect public health and also creates local jobs that cannot be outsourced. By working quickly and cooperatively we are able to bring these federal tax dollars back home for good use in our Hudson Valley communities. We are spending recovery funds wisely by focusing on projects that will create long term value for years to come by providing clean water to communities.”

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney said: “Clean water is what helped build the Empire State – from the reservoirs downstate to the Erie Canal – so it’s appropriate that recovery funds are being spent on these clean water projects throughout New York State.”

Congressman Eric Massa said: “I’m proud to help announce this $7.4 million investment in the water infrastructure of the village and town of Cuba. Creating jobs, improving our infrastructure and strengthening our local economy are the reasons why I voted for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. I look forward to joining in making more announcements like this in the near future.”

Congressman John M. McHugh: “Improving wastewater infrastructure is essential for many small communities, yet often cost prohibitive for localities to finance on their own. This funding will help to ensure that many small localities in Northern and Central New York have the funds to make the improvements necessary to bring benefit to current and future residents and businesses. I thank Governor Paterson for selecting these important projects in the 23rd District.”

Congresswoman Louise M. Slaughter said: “The enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has enabled us to not only invest in much-needed water infrastructure projects but to create good jobs and strengthen communities.”

State Senator Antoine Thompson, Chair of the Senate Environmental Conservation Committee, said: “I am a big supporter of clean water and protecting the environment. I applaud the Governor for securing this funding for clean water infrastructure repairs.”

State Senator Darrel Aubertine said: “It is vital to the environmental and economic well being of New York State that we create green jobs that also solve problems our communities face. Communities all across New York State will benefit from the use of this stimulus money for the necessary upgrade of our aging wastewater infrastructure in ways that allow for continued growth.”

State Senator Brian X. Foley: “It is absolutely critical that stimulus money is disbursed quickly so we can put New Yorkers back to work and grow our economy out of the current recession. I am proud to join Governor Paterson in announcing a $10.4 million project to build a new water treatment plan in the Brookhaven industrial park known as the Brookhaven Technology Center. This project will boost our local economy by allowing for more dense economic development. It will also help protect our groundwater and help working families in Suffolk enjoy cleaner, healthier water.”

State Senator David Valesky said: “The much-needed replacement of aging water infrastructure and the corresponding job creation will have a lasting positive impact on our Upstate communities.”

Assemblyman Charles Lavine said: “ARRA funds will help homeowners maintain property values by addressing and preventing septic system discharges along the water. Additionally, these funds will play an important part of protecting the ecological makeup that is threatened by wastewater. I thank Governor Paterson and the New York Congressional Delegation for their hard work in advocating for these federal dollars during this recession.”

Assemblyman Marc Alessi said: “Clean water infrastructure is one of the most important investments we can make. I am excited to see that federal stimulus money will help the Town of Brookhaven with this project that will improve the quality of our drinking water, create jobs, and help protect the environment.”

Assemblywoman Francine DelMonte said: “The announcement of $11 million dollars in funding for the North Gorge Interceptor water treatment facility is great news for the City of Niagara Falls and the water authority. The federal stimulus dollars the city and county have received through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act are vital in our long term strategy of revitalizing the local economy and improving the infrastructure of the region.”

Assemblyman William Magee said: “The Canastota waste treatment plant has been in need of repairs for a long time. Federal stimulus funds will provide valuable assistance in restoring the tanks and improving the quality of wastewater treatment for the village.”

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