Two prosecutors leave Mueller's office

Prosecutors Ryan Dickey and Brian Richardson are no longer working for the office of special counsel Robert ...

Posted: Aug 31, 2018 2:17 PM
Updated: Aug 31, 2018 2:17 PM

Prosecutors Ryan Dickey and Brian Richardson are no longer working for the office of special counsel Robert Mueller, the Justice Department confirmed.

Both lawyers were relatively junior but frequently spotted members of Mueller's corps. Both have worked on court cases that Mueller opened as part of his investigation into Russian interference and coordination with the Trump campaign in the 2016 presidential election.

2016 Presidential election

Brian Richardson

Continents and regions

Crime, law enforcement and corrections

Criminal law

Donald Trump

Eastern Europe

Elections (by type)

Elections and campaigns

Europe

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Government and public administration

Government bodies and offices

Government departments and authorities

Government organizations - US

Investigations

Justice departments

Law and legal system

Misc people

Political candidates

Political Figures - US

Politics

Robert Mueller

Russia

Russia meddling investigation

Ryan Dickey

US Department of Justice

US federal departments and agencies

US Federal elections

US federal government

US Presidential elections

Peter Carr, a spokesman for the special counsel, declined to explain on Thursday what the departures mean for the state of Mueller's office.

Over this summer, as Mueller opened more criminal cases, other Justice Department units including the US Attorney's Office in Washington and the National Security Division have begun to work on the court action, wedging the cases deeper into the Justice Department's portfolio.

Carr said that neither Dickey nor Richardson left the office because of political allegations, the appearance of bias or any other wrongdoing.

That signals that their departures appear to differ from the situation of Peter Strzok, a top FBI agent moved off of Mueller's team after it was discovered he sent text messages that disparaged President Donald Trump and commented on the firing of FBI Director James Comey.

Trump, in his ongoing attacks of Mueller on Twitter, has repeatedly called the lawyers in the office "17 angry Democrats." Mueller himself is a longtime Republican previously appointed by presidents of both parties to various federal posts, including FBI director days before September 11, 2001.

The special counsel's office now has 15 lawyers at work under Mueller.

Richardson had been among Mueller's attorneys at Dutch lawyer Alex Van Der Zwaan's sentencing in April. Richardson had joined Mueller's office directly -- whereas some lawyers moved over on detail from other parts of the Justice Department -- after he finished a clerkship for Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.

Van Der Zwaan pleaded guilty earlier this year to lying to investigators about his interactions with former Trump campaign leaders Rick Gates and Paul Manafort. Van Der Zwaan went to prison for about a month, then left the US.

Richardson recently became a research fellow at Columbia Law School, according to the law school's spokeswoman Nancy Goldfarb.

Dickey will continue to work on criminal matters at the Justice Department. Though he worked out of Mueller's office last year, he was always employed by the Justice Department's criminal division, specializing in computer and intellectual property crimes.

He has not officially removed himself in court from the legal teams prosecuting three ongoing Mueller-initiated cases. The cases involving Dickey are the indictment of 12 Russian military agents for allegedly hacking Democrats during the election, 16 Russians and companies accused of operating a social media troll farm to influence American voters and the plea deal of a California-based online bank account auctioneer who admitted to identity fraud that helped the Russian social media trolls. That online auctioneer, Richard Pinedo, is scheduled to be sentenced on October 1.

Both Dickey and Richardson were frequent presences at the federal courthouse in DC over the past year, often showing up on days when no public hearings were scheduled even after the court cases they worked on became public. Both appear to have left Mueller's office sometime this summer, though Carr would not confirm their engagement dates.

New York Coronavirus Cases

County data is updated nightly.

Cases: 2110004

Reported Deaths: 53574
CountyCasesDeaths
Kings28059410456
Queens2773009958
Suffolk2010363400
Nassau1836493175
Bronx1835056589
New York1382724500
Westchester1296642291
Erie895791807
Richmond749771841
Monroe689761110
Orange48312843
Rockland46944963
Onondaga38931677
Dutchess29472445
Albany24699356
Oneida22619514
Niagara20035373
Broome18623366
Saratoga15364168
Ulster13908257
Schenectady13202205
Rensselaer11229142
Putnam1060692
Chautauqua8951145
Chemung7761136
Oswego762292
Ontario740693
Steuben6952145
Sullivan667376
St. Lawrence664096
Cayuga633792
Jefferson613668
Wayne578370
Cattaraugus572091
Genesee5435124
Herkimer5187109
Clinton483533
Madison456289
Livingston452060
Fulton442291
Tompkins434652
Montgomery4254126
Columbia4064104
Cortland392662
Tioga383063
Warren365857
Wyoming358253
Allegany355587
Chenango349976
Otsego346247
Greene340379
Washington316255
Orleans311883
Lewis280836
Franklin256312
Delaware238138
Seneca201156
Schoharie169217
Essex159326
Yates117826
Schuyler107514
Hamilton3132
Unassigned9315
Out of NY0250
Utica
Clear
47° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 45°
Feels Like: 47°
Oneonta
Clear
50° wxIcon
Hi: 64° Lo: 42°
Feels Like: 50°
Herkimer
Clear
47° wxIcon
Hi: 67° Lo: 44°
Feels Like: 47°
Old Forge
Clear
47° wxIcon
Hi: 62° Lo: 42°
Feels Like: 47°
WKTV Radar
WKTV Temperatures
WKTV Severe Weather
Senior Send-Off brought to you by Herkimer College
18 Facets of Summer Photo Contest brought to you by Herkimer Diamond Mines
Looking for work or looking to hire? Check out the WKTV Job Fair!
Alivana Ready for Summer Giveaway
Saluting Those Who Are Proud 2 Serve