Government shutdown: By the numbers

As the government shutdown nears the end of its second week, around 800,000 federal workers remain out of wo...

Posted: Jan 4, 2019 4:30 AM
Updated: Jan 4, 2019 4:30 AM

As the government shutdown nears the end of its second week, around 800,000 federal workers remain out of work or working without pay. Tens of thousands of people working for federal contractors are out of work as well.

Here's a closer look at some of the numbers behind what is shaping up to be one of the longest government shutdowns in American history:

Budget deficits

Business, economy and trade

Civil servants

Economy and economic indicators

Federal budget

Federal budget deficit

Federal employees

Government and public administration

Government budgets

Government organizations - US

Labor and employment

Legislation

Political platforms and issues

Politics

Public debt

Public finance

US Congress

US federal government shutdowns

Workers and professionals

Appropriations

US Senate

Since Democrats are taking control of the House and it is officially the 116th Congress, this is the first time a government shutdown has extended into two different sessions of Congress. On January 3, at 13 days, it becomes the fourth longest shutdown in American history. The longest shutdown came during the Clinton administration and it lasted 21 days.

President Donald Trump and former President Jimmy Carter are the only presidents to oversee government shutdowns while their party controlled both chambers of Congress.

They are also the only two presidents to oversee three shutdowns in the same year. The federal government experienced three funding lapses under Jimmy Carter in 1977 when both chambers of Congress were Democratic. The current federal shutdown is the third one this year, although the previous two were much shorter.

The money that Congress and Trump are fighting over -- $5 billion for the border wall -- is a small fraction of the overall federal budget. The total federal budget is $4.4 trillion, but 70% of that is mandatory spending. The other 30% is discretionary spending that lawmakers appropriate each year. This is where funding for federal agencies comes in.

This year, discretionary spending for federal agencies was not passed in one single 'omnibus' spending package like it has been in the recent past. Some agencies, like the Defense Department, had their funding bills passed before the end of 2018. Each agency has a separate appropriations process. 2018 was the first year in more than a decade that some of the congressional appropriations bills were passed on time. That's why only certain agencies are shut down.

Approximately 380,000 federal employees are furloughed, meaning they cannot go to work and are not being paid, according to Democrats on the Senate Appropriations Committee. Four hundred and twenty thousand federal employees are working in what the government deems essential positions and are required to continue working without pay.

Tens of thousands of employees working for federal contractors are impacted by the shutdown as well, according to Professional Services Council Executive Vice President and Counsel Alan Chvotkin. PSC is an advocacy organization that represents government technology and professional services federal contractors.

In past shutdowns, Congress has passed legislation to pay back federal employees for the time they were not paid during the shutdown. People working for federal contractors, however, may not receive the same back pay that full time federal employees do.

It is nearly impossible to nail down a specific number of how many federal contract employees are impacted by this shutdown. The impacts of the shutdown vary by department and agency, and there is no central database of stop work orders from agencies to contractors or how many affected contractors are impacted by those orders. The impact of the shutdown also changes as the shutdown continues because some work that could continue originally with other funds may no longer be able to do so, according to a PSC spokesperson.

Agencies and departments impacted by the shutdown include some of the key federal government services, like law enforcement, travel screening and business services, although many of those workers, like FBI special agents and TSA screeners, will continue to work without pay for the moment.

The agencies involved in the shutdown include the Departments of Justice, Treasury, Commerce, Agriculture, Homeland Security, Interior, Transportation and Housing and Urban Development. Part of the State Department are also closed. Other key federal institutions like the Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, the Smithsonian museums, including the National Zoo in Washington, DC, are also affected.

Many of the closed agencies provide key law enforcement functions. Homeland Security houses the Transportation Security Administration, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection. The Justice Department houses the FBI and a significant portion of both of these departments are essential employees working without pay.

But federally-run museums and national parks have been shut down.

And IRS workers have also been furloughed. They were already scrambling to deal with the new tax law. Tax day has been delayed after at least one previous government shutdown, but it's not clear if that will happen now. It's also not clear when this partial shutdown will end.

New York Coronavirus Cases

County data is updated nightly.

Cases: 2506247

Reported Deaths: 55965
CountyCasesDeaths
Kings33129910834
Queens31382710273
Suffolk2383183590
Nassau2136033286
Bronx2067916745
New York1674924632
Westchester1433882338
Erie1054771938
Richmond882931930
Monroe835191180
Orange57192909
Rockland52859779
Onondaga51456755
Dutchess35411497
Albany30510386
Oneida28347582
Broome24121403
Niagara23795397
Saratoga20034197
Ulster17179277
Schenectady16525227
Rensselaer14618167
Putnam1242096
Chautauqua12281172
Oswego11449112
Chemung10740153
St. Lawrence10354124
Steuben9972173
Ontario9244110
Jefferson867574
Cayuga8582107
Sullivan839483
Wayne801884
Cattaraugus7586112
Genesee6904132
Herkimer6671125
Clinton663138
Tompkins646359
Fulton6228102
Madison6092102
Montgomery5865138
Livingston564971
Warren537181
Cortland528479
Tioga501271
Columbia4966111
Chenango463586
Allegany454296
Washington453367
Otsego452654
Greene434286
Wyoming433657
Orleans428087
Franklin417920
Lewis355038
Delaware350747
Seneca271663
Schoharie227221
Essex224531
Yates158827
Schuyler151317
Hamilton4343
Unassigned14424
Out of NY0310
Utica
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Oneonta
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